Derbyshire

Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. It includes much of the Peak District National Park, the southern end of the Pennine range of hills, and part of the National Forest. It borders Greater Manchester to the north-west, West Yorkshire to the north, South Yorkshire to the north-east, Nottinghamshire to the east, Leicestershire to the south-east, Staffordshire to the west and south-west, and Cheshire to the west. Kinder Scout, at 636 metres (2,087 ft), is the highest point and Trent Meadows, where the River Trent leaves Derbyshire, the lowest at 27 metres (89 ft). The north–south River Derwent is the longest river at 66 mi (106 km). In 2003 the Ordnance Survey named Church Flatts Farm at Coton in the Elms near Swadlincote as Britain's furthest point from the sea. Derby is a unitary authority area, but remains part of the ceremonial county. The non-metropolitan county has 30 towns of 10,000–100,000 inhabitants, but much sparsely populated farming upland.


Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. It includes much of the Peak District National Park, the southern end of the Pennine range of hills, and part of the National Forest. It borders Greater Manchester to the north-west, West Yorkshire to the north, South Yorkshire to the north-east, Nottinghamshire to the east, Leicestershire to the south-east, Staffordshire to the west and south-west, and Cheshire to the west. Kinder Scout, at 636 metres (2,087 ft), is the highest point and Trent Meadows, where the River Trent leaves Derbyshire, the lowest at 27 metres (89 ft). The north–south River Derwent is the longest river at 66 mi (106 km). In 2003 the Ordnance Survey named Church Flatts Farm at Coton in the Elms near Swadlincote as Britain's furthest point from the sea. Derby is a unitary authority area, but remains part of the ceremonial county. The non-metropolitan county has 30 towns of 10,000–100,000 inhabitants, but much sparsely populated farming upland.
Read article on Wikipedia