Childe

In the Middle Ages, a childe or child was the son of a nobleman who had not yet attained knighthood or had not yet won his spurs. As a rank in chivalry it was used as a title, e.g. Child Horn in King Horn, whilst a male progressed through the positions of squire and then knight. The term is now obsolete in standard English but is still well-known from poetry, such as Robert Browning's Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came and Lord Byron's Childe Harold's Pilgrimage.


In the Middle Ages, a childe or child was the son of a nobleman who had not yet attained knighthood or had not yet won his spurs. As a rank in chivalry it was used as a title, e.g. Child Horn in King Horn, whilst a male progressed through the positions of squire and then knight. The term is now obsolete in standard English but is still well-known from poetry, such as Robert Browning's Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came and Lord Byron's Childe Harold's Pilgrimage.
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